Friday, May 25, 2018

Green Like Kermit


By Kathy

I am sitting at the Toussaint-Louverture Airport in Port au Prince, Haiti, waiting for a flight back to Indiana.  It is hard to sum up all the feelings I have when I go back to the US.  Our work takes us to the US about 10-12 weeks per year, so I am back and forth between the 2 countries frequently.  Mark and I thought we would get used to the transition, and the emotions would diminish.  We were wrong.
Source: La Nouvelliste
When I travel back to the US, I am ecstatic to see my kids, grandkids, siblings, mother, extended family, old friends.  I am very grateful for today’s means of communications, although Facetime doesn’t come close to a real live snuggle session with my grandchildren, or an intimate conversation with my sister over coffee.  Many of the daily stressors I feel in Haiti melt away when I am in the US, including the uncertainty of navigating a foreign culture and language, never knowing when a protest may spring up on our way to work, being asked for money or other commodities at every turn, being stared at wherever we are, and never really having the privacy we know in the US.  Being back in a familiar place, the town where we raised our kids and developed our life-long friendships, is comfortable and reassuring.  Knowing that there are a zillion benefits our country provides every day that we don’t even think about, like smooth roads, a well-developed justice system, free public education, and so much more, makes life in the US easy on many levels. 

All of those warm and fuzzy feelings are mixed in with a variety of very uncomfortable feelings.  I am privileged.  I was born into privilege.  There is no denying that.  I have the ability to whip out my passport and credit card and fly to a developed country where I am a citizen with all its rights and privileges.  In Haiti, I interact with people on a weekly basis who are bright, ambitious, educated, but can’t find consistent work.  I leave them to go to the US, where I see “Now Hiring” signs at every turn.  That feels weird, and unfair.  I leave a country where a large percentage of people go hungry on any given day, to see an airport food court full of food, more food in one place than many of our Haitian friends have ever seen all at once.  Just in one food court.  That feels weird, and unfair.  And I could go on…

on Flag Day, Haitians' pride is seen
But Haiti has long been viewed by many as a country full of poor, helpless people that need foreign help to survive and advance.  Haiti is a financially poor country, it is true, but rich in a vast variety of other ways, ways often overlooked by foreigners.  The sense of community here is something we don’t often see in the US, not to the extent we see in Haiti.  The resilience of the Haitian people is something from which the rest of the world can learn.  The pride Haitians have in their country, their heritage, their culture, despite years of patristic and superior attitudes from other people groups, is something to be revered.  Haiti is a place that the rest of the world would be bettered by visiting, with the sole purpose of learning about the Haitian people.

And living in Haiti, honestly, for the first couple years, I was stretched so far and tight I thought I might break.  But now, Haiti has become a part of me, my second home.  I continue to be stretched, and am learning more about God and myself than I ever have before.  I am not Haitian, and can never be.  If I lived the next 30 years of my life in Haiti, I would continue to learn new things about the Haitian people, the language, and the culture here every day (and I would also be very old!).  No, I am not Haitian, but neither am I the person I was before I moved here.  I have heard it said that living in a foreign country is like this:  In the US, everyone is yellow.  I was once yellow.  Haitians are blue.  Living in Haiti, I now am a shade of green.  Green like Kermit.  And sometimes it’s not easy being green.  But I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

13 Pounds and 29 Inches


BY KATHY

Written December 2017

Yesterday at the clinic was a “typical” day.  It started with my trying to copy some data from our server.  Seems like an easy task.  IT folks are hard to come by here, and with the way things are networked, inavailability of the proper cables, and my lack of tech savvy, let’s just say I had to put that one back on the back burner. 

Then I tried to untangle an accounting snag I had.  I stared at my numbers, tried various permutations, told Mark I didn’t think I had the accounting prowess, and then was suddenly inspired to try something different.  It worked.  Success!

I decorated for the monthly staff birthday party, then sat down to my desk to write a report from a recent speech therapy evaluation.  After frequent knocks on the door from a wide variety of folks with a wide variety of requests, I decided today was the not the day I would be able to finish that report.

Clinic nurse instructing families on nutrition
Eventually the line of patients dwindled, so I went downstairs to host the party.  At that point, a tap tap rolled in with a load of patients.  The clinic participates in a malnutrition program in conjunction with another nonprofit, and the health department in Haiti, and USAID.  Eleven small mountain clinics are manned by local Haitian nurses, who identify severely malnourished children and refer them to this program.  From there, children are sent to many clinics throughout Haiti that have agreed to see the children, monitor their progress, provide education, and supply families with Plumpy Nut (a fortified peanut butter with research to back its effectiveness with malnutrition).  It is a great program, but there there are not enough places in Haiti to send the kids in need, so our particular clinic is always stretched when the families come, trying to see more children in need than our resources would suggest we could.

So, the families filed in.  One of our nurses in charge sent for me and asked me to take pictures.  I told her I never take pictures of anyone without permission first.  She assured me she would get permission first, and explained that we need to make sure people in the US know the depth of the need so they would be moved to help fund the program.  We need another nurse or two to run the program, to see more kids.  I started to take pictures of some of the kids and moms she had spoken with.  One caught my eye in particular.  A beautiful little girl with an older woman, her grandmother?  The little girl was too weak to stand without help.  This 4 ½ year old weighed 13 pounds, 29 inches tall.  Thirteen pounds, 29 inches.  She was the same age as my granddaughter.  My granddaughter, who is 40 pounds, and 44 inches tall.  The comparison haunted me, and left an indelible image in my mind.
 
Our granddaughter, during a Facetime visit
I thought about this child’s life, and the difficulty with which the parents must have in procuring enough food for their children.  I thought about what her living conditions must be like.  I thought about how long the family journeyed that day to try to get help for their little girl.  I thought about the injustice of the chasm between the “haves” and the “have nots”.

Clinic nurses taking arm
circumference measurements
I tried to turn my focus back to the job at hand.  The picture I took of this little girl.  What do I do with this picture?  Do I plaster it all over Facebook, in an effort to help others understand the dire need for help for kids in this situation?  Does that reduce this little girl’s life to a set of statistics, to a heart-wrenching photo, objectifying her?  Conversely, does using this picture make her life matter more, by using her image to help other children?  How do I respect her?  How do I show her dignity?  How do I honor her family?

It would have been wonderful if the clinic had the capability to keep her under our care until she became stronger.  Again, the layers became apparent: 
o   At this point we were not open 24/7 and did not have the capabilities to keep this child overnight, which threw us into another layer of seeking care.  Since this little one is but one of several at the clinic, which child from that group would we choose?  The child who was the same age as our granddaughter especially touched our heart, but what about the 22 others?  There were 5-6 of that group who were similarly malnourished.  Which one would we choose?  And the next week, when another batch comes in, and the next week, and the next week…
o   If the arrangements could be made for other kind souls to care for the girl until she regained her strength, what would that look like?  Would they care for only the girl, without her family?  What if the girl passed during the time they kept her, without her family at her side?  How would that feel to the family?  This particular question came to mind because we have lived through a similar scenario in the past, when a Haitian child was taken to the US for life-saving surgery.  After the surgery, she did not recover, and passed while still in the US, without her family by her side.  In that case, the father thanked us profusely for the quality care her child received, though her life could not be saved.  The mother, however, blamed those who tried to help for her daughter’s death and grieved deeply for years after.  How would I feel if I were that mother?
o   If arrangements could be made for others to care for the whole family, rather than just the one child, what would that look like?  “Family” in Haiti has a different definition that in the US.  “Family” here means mom, dad, kids, cousins, grandma, grandpa, aunts, uncles…  How many family members would we be able to find care for?  To help this one child.  While the others are not chosen.  Important for that one, for sure, but the situation continues on…

So I continued on that clinic day, taking the pictures our Haitian nurse requested, trying to maintain my composure, praying for more resources to make a positive impact for these precious ones.  Just another typical day.

The story continues…
As of January 15, 2018, the Church of God Hospital in Haiti opened its doors 24/7.  The malnutrition clinic continues, and emergency care is now available around the clock. 

The public has a special opportunity to learn more about this medical ministry during an evening of fun and purpose at the Bare Toe Ball on April 28th, at Madison Park Church of God from 4-7.  Tickets can be purchased at missionhaitimedical.tickets.qtego.net.

Want to make a difference each month?  Our Malnutrition Program costs $500 a month. We currently have supporters for half of this amount monthly, but are in need of more support to ensure that this program can continue.  If you would like to help with this need you can make a one time donation at https://www.missionhaitimedical.org/giving/ or email chelsea@missionhaitimedical.org  to give a monthly gift for this program. 

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

One World, Under God

BY MARK


Over the last few months, the administrative team at the hospital where we serve has been preparing to open the emergency department at our facility.  The time of the opening was drawing near and as often happens in Haiti, it seemed as if things would not even be close to being prepared on time.  The community had been invited to an open house on the January 13, prior to the January 15 opening of the ER. 

As of the morning of the 12th, two areas of the hospital still had tile that was being laid, painting was only about 75% finished in several areas, and the trash blowing around the yard resembled a nice snowfall in our native Indiana.  When asked, my staff kept saying, “don’t worry!”  But I did worry.  Too many things were left undone with too little time to do them.  At the close of the clinic day on the 13th, work to finish the facility continued in earnest.  Approximately 20 members of our staff began working like ants at a picnic and several members of the local church descended upon the place with broom, mops, rags, and capable hands.  The community and the staff came together and worked, and worked some more, and then several of them spent the night at the facility so the work could continue in shifts. 



The next morning (the morning of the big community celebration) more people came to work on the area around the hospital, picking up trash, pulling weeds, and generally sprucing up the place.  Food was prepared for the guests and about an hour before the scheduled time to begin the celebration, the painters and the tile layers finished their jobs.  The senators, magistrates, local VIPs, and the rest of us began arriving to what looked like a long-finished project.  Several people commented about my needless worrying as the event went off without a hitch.  The pride the community had was evident in their involvement.  The belief in the project was echoed by all in attendance as our staff excitedly gave tours, highlighting their efforts and the medical assistance to come for so many.  As the evening wore on, the servers served, the politicians spoke, the VIP’s schmoozed, and Kathy and I were impressed with our staff and community. 


Recently, some negative comments about Haiti have bounced around the US press.  I doubt that the ones who allegedly spoke the comments have really spent time getting to know the people of Haiti who have welcomed us into their homes, their families, and their lives without any hesitation.  If only the negative-talk perpetrators could have seen the wonderful evening of celebration that we shared that evening!!!  Our small hospital, our Haitian friends, our Haitian staff, and the country of Haiti all have their faults, and can improve.  We know that.  In Anderson, IN, where we lived for a few decades, our small hospital, our Anderson friends, our Anderson neighbors, and the United States all have their faults and can improve.  What is great is that we can work together as a global community, with a purpose and a goal to improve our circumstances.  Our hope is that we can be One world, under God with liberty and justice for all!

Thursday, December 14, 2017

From Pressure to Prayer to ER

BY MARK

It was sometime in September when the “last straw” was piled on that tipped the balance.  I do not know the young lady’s name, but I do know that she was a 20-year-old who attended the local Baptist church in Saintard.  She was an asthmatic who was in the midst of a respiratory crisis and our facility was closed for the day.  Her family transported her to the under-funded government facility about 30 minutes away that did the best they could for her, but being financially strapped, they were without a working nebulizer, without oxygen, and without many of the things that we take for granted as a “given” in an emergency room.  After they did all that they could with what they were given, the young lady succumbed to her asthma attack. 

Her story quickly spread through the village and someone or someones asked why the Church of God hospital was still not open 24/7.  After all, the Church of God hospital has oxygen.  The Church of God hospital has nebulizers and albuterol.  The Church of God hospital has a lot of medications that the government hospital is unable to obtain.  The Church of God hospital has also been telling the citizens of Saintard for years that they have a desire to open an ER.  Why has this not happened??  So the community decided to discover why the Hôpital L’Eglise De Dieu Réformé (Church of God hospital) was still not open around the clock to service those in need and to find out what they could do to “make it happen”.  The inquiries began.  Local leaders began to visit.  Government officials asked questions of us.  The UN stopped by.  All of them emphasized that because of our inability to open 24/7, people are dying.  As I tried to explain that we needed more education for our staff and we needed more funding to make it happen, the answers fell upon deaf ears.  People are dying, they said.  So, the Haitian hospital board, along with the US hospital board, began to pray more earnestly.  What are the barriers that keep us from opening?  The barriers fell into four main categories:

1)   Finances
2)   Facility limitations
3)   Trained staff to complete necessary treatments
4)   Ongoing procurement of necessary supplies

All of us, the Haitian component as well as the US component, bathed the issues in prayer.  After weeks of praying, and hours upon hours of crunching numbers, discussing logistics, making plans for continued intensive education, and identifying Haitian staff, we all felt led to open Hôpital L’Eglise de Dieu Réformé as a 24/7 facility in January 2018. 


We are all excited…and some of us (namely yours truly) are scared!  Scared of failure.  Scared of inadequacy.  Scared of the mistakes we will make.  Scared of this and that.  We only have funding to cover the expenses of the ER for a few months and maybe God will choose to close the doors after that.  We only have supplies that will last a matter of months.  Our staff is still unsure where they will sleep and how it will work.  The facility and training may never be finished adequately.  I don’t know.  The only thing I do know is that we serve a God who is bigger than finances, facility limitations, and staffing and supply issues.  We are jumping off of the proverbial cliff with our limitations and baggage in hand and pray that we are making the right choices. 

I am told that when people trust God in situations like this, that they grow.  I don’t know about you, but sometimes I have growing pains.  Maybe I don’t want to grow right now.  For me, it is often tough to let go and “jump” for fear the landing will be ugly.  I am afraid of the landing, but the only thing that I know for sure, is that there is a landing somewhere, sometime, and God will be there too.  I only hope that after I land, I have the faith to say “…and now what should I do?” and be willing to jump again, before someone piles on another “last straw”???.


I hope that you, my friends, “jump” with the faith that God will help you land .